Tension Cable Support

Tension cable supported walls offer a visual “wow” factor unlike other point-supported glass walls. As the support cables are so slender, the glass appears to float free without an obvious support structure. This highly technical look is a more costly point supported system and is generally used in large entrance lobbies and atriums.

Tension cable supported walls offer a visual “wow” factor unlike other point-supported glass walls. As the support cables are so slender, the glass appears to float free without an obvious support structure. This highly technical look is a more costly point supported system and is generally used in large entrance lobbies and atriums.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF TENSION CABLE SYSTEMS
We can create a support for any system you’re thinking of - we love a challenge and successfully created a crystal on a mountain top last year. However, to inspire…the following are a few commonly used tension cable support configurations.

BOW TRUSS CABLE SYSTEM - APTLY NAMED AFTER ITS INSPIRATION , THE BOW AND ARROW
Inspired by the tension that exists on a classic sporting bow and arrow, our bow truss system (aptly named…) consists of two opposing bow-shaped (curved) cables. The cables are highly tensioned; as they are curved in opposite direction to each other, one offers resistance to the positive wind pressure with the other cable offering resistance to the negative wind pressure. Our spider assembly connects the “bow” cables to the glass and an additional thin cable runs vertically between the spider and the glass to carry the deadload to the structure above. The bow cables are stabilized by another set of cables that run horizontally through the cable clamps.

As the deadload cable runs parallel to vertical joint of the glass and the stabilizing cable runs parallel to the horizontal joints of the glass, the cables disappear visually into the joint of the glass for virtually invisible support.

CABLE NET SYSTEM - TENSIONED LIKE A TENNIS RACKET
The sporting analogies continue with the cable net system which is inspired by (and resembles) the face of a tennis racket with highly tensioned cables that run horizontally and vertically. The glass is connected to the “net” via our spiders; the spiders are attached at the intersections of horizontal and vertical cables. The cables (like strings on a racket) are tensioned around the exterior of the wall.

The Cable Net system is best used on facettedA surface that appears curved, made of flat pieces of glass. walls; when the wall curves, there is more rigidity created in the system as the cables are tensioned around the curve. A flat wall doesn’t work very well as the “net” moves too much and has a higher glass deflectionThe distance that a structural member (such as glass) displaces when under load. This is an important factor to consider in design to manage the stress in the glass..

STELLA CABLE MAST - A NAUTICAL INSIGHT FROM A SAIL BOAT
Sports references once more find their place with our Stella Cable Mast system and its nautical sailboat inspiration. In this system a compression tube acts as the mast along the length of the cables. Due to the way that this tube (mast) is positioned, it carries all the tensile forces from the cables. To keep the tube from bucklingGenerally referred to in fin or tension truss design the glass will collapse due to compression, we recommend that you place three cables in a triangular orientation (from plan view) to create stability.

The Bow Truss and the Cable Net systems would require you to ensure an extremely strong support system as the tension loads from the cables in these systems are transferred to the structure (and these loads can be significant). The bonus of the Stella Cable Mast system is that with the mast carrying all the tension forces, there does not need to be as strong of a structural support with this tension cable system.

IN THE EARLY DAYS OF DESIGN, PLEASE CONSIDER
As mentioned in the Stella Cable Mast system, when the tension forces from the cables are transferred to the surrounding structure, these forces can be extremely high. If you’d like to create a glass wall that is supported by cables, please discuss the cable system with us at the very earliest days of the building design so that you can design a structure that is suitable to support your glass wall.

Products Used

StellaCustom
Stella Custom Part created for this project
StellaCustom

Tension cable supported walls offer a visual “wow” factor unlike other point-supported glass walls. As the support cables are so slender, the glass appears to float free without an obvious support structure. This highly technical look is a more costly point supported system and is generally used in large entrance lobbies and atriums.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF TENSION CABLE SYSTEMS
We can create a support for any system you’re thinking of - we love a challenge and successfully created a crystal on a mountain top last year. However, to inspire…the following are a few commonly used tension cable support configurations.

BOW TRUSS CABLE SYSTEM - APTLY NAMED AFTER ITS INSPIRATION , THE BOW AND ARROW
Inspired by the tension that exists on a classic sporting bow and arrow, our bow truss system (aptly named…) consists of two opposing bow-shaped (curved) cables. The cables are highly tensioned; as they are curved in opposite direction to each other, one offers resistance to the positive wind pressure with the other cable offering resistance to the negative wind pressure. Our spider assembly connects the “bow” cables to the glass and an additional thin cable runs vertically between the spider and the glass to carry the deadload to the structure above. The bow cables are stabilized by another set of cables that run horizontally through the cable clamps.

As the deadload cable runs parallel to vertical joint of the glass and the stabilizing cable runs parallel to the horizontal joints of the glass, the cables disappear visually into the joint of the glass for virtually invisible support.

CABLE NET SYSTEM - TENSIONED LIKE A TENNIS RACKET
The sporting analogies continue with the cable net system which is inspired by (and resembles) the face of a tennis racket with highly tensioned cables that run horizontally and vertically. The glass is connected to the “net” via our spiders; the spiders are attached at the intersections of horizontal and vertical cables. The cables (like strings on a racket) are tensioned around the exterior of the wall.

The Cable Net system is best used on facettedA surface that appears curved, made of flat pieces of glass. walls; when the wall curves, there is more rigidity created in the system as the cables are tensioned around the curve. A flat wall doesn’t work very well as the “net” moves too much and has a higher glass deflectionThe distance that a structural member (such as glass) displaces when under load. This is an important factor to consider in design to manage the stress in the glass..

STELLA CABLE MAST - A NAUTICAL INSIGHT FROM A SAIL BOAT
Sports references once more find their place with our Stella Cable Mast system and its nautical sailboat inspiration. In this system a compression tube acts as the mast along the length of the cables. Due to the way that this tube (mast) is positioned, it carries all the tensile forces from the cables. To keep the tube from bucklingGenerally referred to in fin or tension truss design the glass will collapse due to compression, we recommend that you place three cables in a triangular orientation (from plan view) to create stability.

The Bow Truss and the Cable Net systems would require you to ensure an extremely strong support system as the tension loads from the cables in these systems are transferred to the structure (and these loads can be significant). The bonus of the Stella Cable Mast system is that with the mast carrying all the tension forces, there does not need to be as strong of a structural support with this tension cable system.

IN THE EARLY DAYS OF DESIGN, PLEASE CONSIDER
As mentioned in the Stella Cable Mast system, when the tension forces from the cables are transferred to the surrounding structure, these forces can be extremely high. If you’d like to create a glass wall that is supported by cables, please discuss the cable system with us at the very earliest days of the building design so that you can design a structure that is suitable to support your glass wall.